Top 10 Deadliest Typhoons That Ravaged The Philippines

Let’s all prepare and stay safe!
posted on: Friday, December 5, 2014
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Digital Agitator

Brace yourselves everyone, another typhoon is coming… and always will be coming to us.

This might be morbid, but here are the 10 deadliest recorded typhoons that ravaged the Philippines. Note that some strong typhoons should have been in the list but happened some 100 years ago that the numbers are really fuzzy to include.

Stay safe!

10. Typhoon Frank (Fengshen) – June 2008

typhoon frank fengshen 2008

www.typhoon2000.ph

The ferry MV Princess of the Stars capsized off the coast of San Fernando, Romblon at the height of Typhoon Frank, killing more than 800 people.

Death Toll: ~938 dead

Wind Speed: 205 kilometers per hour

Region Affected: Luzon, Visayas

Frank is now retired and replaced by the name Ferdie.

 

9. Typhoon Sisang (Nina) – November 1987

typhoon sisang nina 1987

Wikipedia

Sisang was the worst typhoon that struck the Philippines in 17 years, since Yoling (Patsy) in 1970.

Death Toll: ~979 dead

Wind Speed: 270 kilometers per hour

Region Affected: Luzon

Sisang is now retired and replaced by the name Sendang.

 

8. Typhoon Amy – December 1951

typhoon amy 1951

Wikipedia

Amy’s landfall coincided with the eruption of Mt. Hibok-Hibok on Camiguin Island, causing disruption to volcanic relief operations and displacing evacuees who evacuated due to the volcanic eruption.

Death Toll: ~991 dead

Damage: $30 million US dollars (1951 exchange rate)

Wind Speed: 220 kilometers per hour

Region Affected: Visayas

 

7. Typhoon Trix – October 1952

typhoon trix 1952

climatism.wordpress.com

Death Toll: ~995 dead

Wind Speed: 220 kilometers per hour

Region Affected: Bicol

 

6. Tropical Storm Sendong (Washi) – December 2011

tropical storm sendong in 2011

mindanews.com

Death Toll: ~1200 dead

Damage: 1.6 billion pesos

Wind Speed: 95 kilometers per hour

Region Affected:  Mindanao

Sendong is now retired and replaced by the name Sarah.

 

5. Typhoon Nitang (Ike) – September 1984

typhoon nitang ike in 1984

NASA via noaahrd.wordpress.com

Death Toll: ~1440 dead

Damage: $1 billion or 16.7 billion pesos (1984 exchange rate)

Wind Speed:  230 kilometers per hour

Region Affected:  Northern Mindanao

Nitang is now retired and replaced by the name Ningning.

 

4. Tropical Depression Winnie – November 2004

tropical depression winnie

www.typhoon2000.ph

Not long after Winnie devastated the Philippines, the country was struck by another, more powerful tropical cyclone – Typhoon Yoyong (Nanmadol) killed 70 people.

Death Toll: ~1500 dead/missing

Damage: 678 million pesos

Wind Speed: 55 kilometers per hour

Region Affected: Southern Luzon

Winnie is now retired and replaced by the name Warren.

3. Typhoon Pablo (Bopha) – December 2012

supertyphoon pablo

inquirer.net

Typhoon Pablo was considered as the strongest cyclone to ever hit Mindanao.

Death Toll: ~1100 dead, 800 missing

Damage: 42 billion pesos

Wind Speed: 280 kilometers per hour

Region Affected:  Mindanao

Pablo is now retired and replaced by the name Pepito.

 

2. Tropical Storm Uring (Thelma) – November 1991

tropical storm uring thelma

www.skyscrapercity.com

Though Uring’s wind speed was weak, it was the tremendous rainfall it produced. It also struck the Philippines just 5 months after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo.

Death Toll: 5000 – 8000 dead/missing

Damage: About $27.67 million or 1.23 billion pesos (1991 exchange rate)

Wind Speed: 85 kilometers per hour

Region Affected: Visayas

Uring is now retired and replaced by the name Ulding.

 

1. Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) – November 2013

typhoon yolanda haiyan satellite image

www.abc.net.au

Supertyphoon Yolanda is the deadliest typhoon that struck the Philippines and considered as one of the most powerful cyclones ever recorded.

Death Toll: ~6340 dead, ~1061 missing

Damage: 89 billion pesos

Wind Speed: 315 kilometers per hour

Region most affected: Eastern Visayas

Yolanda is now retired and replaced by the name Yasmin.

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