This Ukay-Ukay Mountain in Cebu Can Make Yolanda Victims Happy. What You Will See Will Shock You

Are these clothes really for the Yolanda victims?
posted on: Tuesday, February 4, 2014
Rodel Montebon
Katkat, katkats everywhere.
lifestylehacker

It is not quite pleasant to talk about the disasters that happened in the past, especially the 7.2 magnitude earthquake and the super typhoon Yolanda. Those fresh, noteworthy disasters shattered many lives.

And yes, many would not like to talk about them…but some girl posted something on her Facebook account, which we couldn’t help but notice. The moment she posted it, right then and there someone commented which became like a thread:

yolanda victims

This is the photo they commented on:

Netizens at the Ukay-Ukay mountain

And then someone posted another picture again which gained comments:

Ukay Ukay Mountain Facebook Post

This was the picture posted:

Girl at Ukay-Ukay mountain

Facebook

Now, who on earth wouldn’t be enraged by those photos plus those comments?

So we at tenminutes.ph decided to visit the place and check if the speculations were true.

clothes in the street

The place is located in Babag 2 in Cordova, Cebu, a very small town where means of living are mostly fishing.

The area, where where the locals call as the “ukay-ukay mountain”, is owned by Virlo Construction Development Corp.

1 Bundle of Clothes

Are those clothes intended for the Yolanda Victims?

The moment you enter the area, large bundles of clothes immediately welcome you.

Bundles of clothes at Cordova Ukay-Ukay Mountain

Go further, you will meet the cashier. Yes, the CASHIER (because they are selling those bundles of clothes) asking, “Mangukay mo, sir?”

Cashier at Cordova

Pass through the cashier and well, you won’t see clothes in bundles anymore but these:

clothes in the street

Lola looking for UkayUkay

So you think only those? Heck no, because as you go further, you will know what Ukay-Ukay Mountain really looks like…

Ukay Ukay Mountain

Can’t imagine how high the mountain is? Well, check the view when you are on top of it:

Ukay Ukay Mountain

And this:

Ukay Ukay Range

And are those really for the Yolanda victims? So we tried to ask the cashier.Ukay ukay man

There was this company in MEPZA, which sells ukay-ukay. The whole building was filled with bundles of ukay-ukay.

The Virlo Construction Corp. bought the said building along with the ukay-ukay worth Php 3 million pesos.

Virlo Construction

They transferred those bundles in their construction site last November 2013. You see, those were tied with thick metal wires.

Virlo Construction

They even put this sign.

Signage at the Ukay Ukay Mountain

But no, people brought along with them pliers in order to cut those wires which made the Ukay-Ukay Mountain manifest into reality.

Some clothes at the Streets

Since they can’t help it, the construction company started selling those, in kilos at first. But they eventually sell it at a cheaper price like 5 pesos per piece, the price depends on what kind of item you like.

Cheaper price at thrift shop

They even donated 500 bundles to the victims of the super typhoon. Each bundle cost Php 1,000.

bundles

But what made the area known is that some locals said that they found some jewelries–gold….

ka bino jewelries

photo by Ka Bino and no, this is not pure gold but colored like gold

 

… and dollars.

dollar

But others went there to buy clothes. Young…

young ukay ukay

…and old alike.

old ukay ukay

Those are not just ordinary clothes, because you’ll find Neiman Marcus blazers:

ukay ukay blazer

Ariel Berdon

 

ukay ukay blazer

And nightie from Victoria’s Secret.

Ka Bino Guerrero fitting some ukay-ukay clothes

Ka Bino

Just shop in there and you’ll be thankful for your Php 100.

Cashiers at Ukay-Ukay Mountain

One day is not enough when shopping in the Ukay-Ukay Mountain.

So if you’re hungry, you can eat the famous lechon in Ayer’s Lechon plus a cold buko juice. Perfect!

lechon

So now we know that they were not really intended for the Yolanda victims.

But even if those clothes were not intended for the victims of disasters, something must be done instead of being left there to rot, right?

 

Comments

comments

'